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Contact: Maria Fulford,
Email: mariaf598@yahoo.com
 
Introduction

Homeland Visit South Korea
Think about group homeland visits organized by The Children’s Bridge, an adoption agency with over 14 years of experience working and traveling in Korea and other countries.

Why go on a homeland visit with your child?

Traveling to your child’s country of birth to learn about their heritage is an irreplaceable experience. It can open the door for discussions about their culture and adoption. I know, from first-hand experience with my child that it instils a sense of pride built on direct contact. The trip makes the culture a lively rich reality far more tangible for a child than sporadic celebrations at occasional events. Visiting South Korea makes your child a participant in the culture of a dynamic and exciting country rather than being a distant observer of a far off “foreign” land. The trip sends a strong message that your family values South Korea and its place in your family history.

I encourage you to look at the following stories about families who have experienced a homeland tour:

South Korea Homeland Visit - July 2015
By Amy Murphy (CB September 2015 issue) (will be online in september)

South Korea Homeland Visit - July 2015
Max and Lily go to Korea! (CB September 2015 issue) (will be online in september)

South Korea Homeland Visit - March 2015
Discovering the Land of the Morning Calm (CB June 2015 issue)

South Korea Homeland Visit - March 2015
"Mom, could our family go and live in Korea?" (CB June 2015 issue)

South Korea Homeland Visit - 2014
My Motherland Tour - By Tamlyn Joy Ah Jin Stewart (CB September 2014 issue)

South Korea Homeland Visit - 2013
By James Quinlan (CB September 2013 issue)

South Korea Homeland Visit - 2012
Our family's trip to Kesha's Homeland (CB December 2012 issue)

South Korea Homeland Visit - June 2012
By Shelley Marriner (CB September 2012 issue)



How old should my child be?

Children’s Bridge Homeland Visits are open to adoptees 6 years and older at the time of the trip. The adoptees who traveled on the first Children’s Bridge Homeland Visit to China in October 2005 were between six and 10 years old. The children that travelled on the Homeland Visit to Korea were 9 to 12 years of age. All did amazingly well with the challenges of international travel. They adapted to the food, language, toilets, crowds, volume and schedule with as much, if not more, ease than their parents!

What the kids thought….

The Children’s Bridge first South Korea Homeland Visit in June 2012 was a huge hit with all the kids. They enjoyed the range of activities – from seeing ancient sights to visiting The Social Welfare Society – or maybe it was the unique opportunity to be in a group where every family was just like theirs that made the trip special.

Seeing, smelling, touching and being part of a living, evolving, and exciting dynamic South Korea and sharing the adventure with kids just like them is a powerful experience.

Owen said: “I loved everything. I liked all the cool stuff and I liked being there with my friends. I liked learning about the history of Korea. The DMZ was awesome.”

Luka said: ”I loved the food so much. The flavors and spice are yummy! I also really enjoyed seeing the babies at the SWS Baby Reception Home. It made me think that I used to be one of them a long time ago. Also, Korea is a very cool place as they have neat things like Samsung, Lotte World and an acquarium in a shopping mall.”

Kesha said: “So many special memories from Korea that will last forever. Like learning how to eat with chopsticks, meeting my foster mom for the first time and hoping to stay in touch, and getting used to the food and time change because it’s so far away. To think that’s where I was born is just amazing! I will go back there again and maybe learn even more than what I already have learned.”

I encourage you to look at the 2012 , 2013 , 2014 and 2015 CB Newsletters to read the stories of families and young travellers who participated in these visits.